Staying Fit and Healthy During Pregnancy

Staying Fit and Healthy During Pregnancy

There are many myths related to sports during pregnancy, but many women want to do sports during pregnancy and maintain their routines. In this article, we will dispel the myths and give you tips on how to stay healthy and do sports during your pregnancy.

It is important to find a reasonable level, and that depends on the shape you had before, the activities your body was comfortable with, and your health during pregnancy. It would be the best if you discuss it with your doctor or midwife before starting a sports programme. Typically, exercises reduce the level of stress and enhance body image, so pregnant women who are working on their fitness level often feel better about themselves.

Walking and Swimming

You can try some kind of aerobic activities such as walking or swimming, as well as, some flexibility and strengthening workouts like yoga. If you have never been doing regular workouts, it is ok if you start with a 20-30 minute walk a few times a week. Yoga also helps you to get the right breathing techniques, to relax and stay calm. It stretches your body, but the key point is to not push yourself too hard and does not over-stretch yourself. Some poses of yoga are challenging, intense, and powerful, and these exercises should be avoided. Running as an intense activity should also be avoided during pregnancy however after a baby’s birth running can be just perfect exercise. Do not forget to warm up before starting your exercise to avoid injuries.

Walking and Swimming
Walking and Swimming

Vitamins are Important

During pregnancy, it is important to eat the right food as the baby and the mother would get all minerals and vitamins but less sugar and processed fats. It would be good if you ate more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and calcium-rich food. A pregnant woman also needs more water, so be sure to drink eight or more cups a day.

Vitamins are Important
Vitamins are Important

A pregnant woman needs special vitamins such as folic acid and calcium. Folic acid is the synthetic form of the B vitamin and one of the water-soluble vitamins. It is the sum of the folate-active compounds that occur naturally in food. It is involved in various processes such as the division and new formation of cells. It is also essential in the metabolism of certain amino acids. Together with vitamin B12 and B6, folic acid is involved in the breakdown of homocysteine. Folic acid can be found in high concentrations in green plants such as spinach and cabbage. The vitamin is sensitive to external influences such as heat, light, and oxygen.

Calcium During Pregnancy

Calcium is also extremely needed for pregnant women. An average adult person needs 1,000 mg of calcium daily, while pregnant and nursing mothers under 19 years old need 1,200 mg per day. A pregnant woman passes on about 40 g of the mineral calcium to the foetus. Calcium is mainly needed to build and maintain healthy bones and teeth. It also ensures the normal functioning of nerves and muscles. Calcium is useful for blood clotting and fights against inflammation and allergies. During pregnancy, the growing unborn child gets the required amount of calcium from the mother’s bone depots. If the pregnant woman does not consume enough calcium with her food, she may develop a calcium deficiency.